WP4 Political and financial support

Lead beneficiary: Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences (Greece), Manchester Metropolitan University (United Kingdom)

Work Package 4 develops a broad network of key stakeholders across Europe. It will offer a communications platform with which to influence those decision makers who need to be able to identify how the results from longitudinal survey data should be integrated into the policy cycle. Policy makers will be engaged through a series of policy briefing papers as wells as webinars and face to face methods. The Work Package aims at engaging with policy makers and funding bodies by appliance of multiple means, including developing policy focused briefings on the uses and benefits of EuroCohort.

Tasks

T4.1. Map the organisation and individual actors involved in relevant policy networks and national funding bodies (both real and virtual) at the European level (all EU Member States),

and to map these policy networks.

T4.2. Identify policy objectives, levers and future needs of actors involved in policy networks and national funding bodies, drawing on insights gained through the Delphi study undertaken in MYWeb.

T4.3. Undertake scenario-planning exercise and on-line survey of this network to identify future policy trends and confirm priority policy areas.

T4.4. Produce policy briefings on longitudinal surveys, survey research infrastructure, using surveys in the policy process and other areas identified through tasks T4.2 and T4.3.

T4.5. Undertake on-line briefings with policy actors and national funding bodies.

T4.6. Undertake meetings with senior policy makers from all EU.

T4.7. Develop a communications protocol for this group that connects them directly to EuroCohort. This includes a dedicated web site area.

Summary of WP4

The main purpose of WP4 was to develop a broad network of key stakeholders across Europe and a communication strategy with which to influence those decision makers who could support EuroCohort and identify how the results from longitudinal survey data should be integrated into the policy cycle. In WP4 we undertook a policy network mapping and analysis, which involved reviewing policy reports, policy statements and websites of key organisations. The main objectives were:

  • To map the organisation and individual actors involved in relevant policy networks (both real and virtual) at the European Member State level, and to map these policy networks, in particular those involved in the ESFRI roadmap,
  • To engage with policy makers and funding bodies and
  • To map and engage with policy makers and funding bodies at a European level

This engagement was meant to take place through:

  • Identifying the policy objectives, levers and future needs of actors involved in policy networks, drawing on insights gained through the Delphi study undertaken in MYWeB project;
  • Developing policy focused briefings on the uses and benefits of EuroCohort, drawing on the policy objectives, levers and future needs and relevant at the policy network level; and
  • Utilise interpersonal interaction (face to face and via email) with policy actors and national funding bodies to further evidence exchange around the uses and benefits of longitudinal surveys on children’s and young people’s well-being, and thereby inform decisions around EuroCohort.

The main outcomes from the policy mapping and networking were that:

  • Research interest has been increased, i.e. the academic community supports the idea of a longitudinal survey on children’ and young people’s well-being.
  • Political support seems also to have been secured through letters of support available in many cases (Ministries and government bodies) and most of the policy makers seem to understand and acknowledge the necessity of a EuroCohort.
  • Interest was also expressed by some organisations in becoming stakeholders during the EuroCohort if this is successful,
  • Dissemination and communication was on a quite good and productive level.
  • Despite the research and political support the issue of financial support seems to be the most complicated and hard to achieve.

In addition a scenario planning exercise that engaged Delphi study group members in order to identify future policy trends and confirm priority policy areas in child and youth well-being in Europe was undertaken. The engagement took the form of short on-line surveys to enable quick identification of ‘signals’ for future policy trends. The main goal of undertaking this exercise was to futureproof the EuroCohort survey to make sure it covers the most pertinent and crucial topics and allow to make sense of the lives of the future children and young people in Europe. The process of the Scenario Planning exercise allowed partners to foster the relationships with key stakeholders through the ability to contribute insights. The outcomes of this exercise, aside from informing the questionnaire design, can be used to develop targeted messages, thought provoking engagement materials, and a business case for EuroCohort that speaks to objectives, interests and future needs of different policy actors.